Mark Landis


Mark Landis

Recent articles

  • Historical events

    The 1st automobile in San Bernardino County arrived in 1899

    On August 10, 1899, residents and shopkeepers rushed into the streets of downtown Redlands to investigate a commotion they had never heard before. The foreign commotion was the rhythmic chugging of a 2-cylinder gasoline engine, and clattering gears that were propelling the Inland Empire’s first automobile through the city streets.Redlands orchardist Cass Gaylord was the proud owner and pilot of the brand-new Haynes-Apperson automobile that was making a historic debut.The...

  • Hiking

    How ‘tourist hikers’ took over San Bernardino, San Gabriel mountains in 1880s

    “The Great Hiking Era” is a fitting phrase used by local historians, to describe the obsession that gripped Southern California from the 1880s to the late 1930s.In the 1880s, Southern California experienced a phenomenal land boom that brought settlers, investors, and tourists to the region in huge numbers. This boom produced a growing number of city dwellers who were drawn to the local mountains to reconnect with their “outdoorsman spirit.”Famed...

  • Book readings and signings

    ‘California’s Gold’ cameraman Luis Fuerte to talk about PBS series at local book signings

    When viewers watching the PBS television series “California’s Gold” heard Huell Howser’s folksy southern drawl call out “Louie, take a look at this,” they knew they were about to see something special or unique.Five-time Emmy-winning cameraman, Luis Fuerte, was the “Louie” behind the lens who worked seamlessly in tandem with Howser to film more than 300 episodes of local interest television shows. In his exuberant style, Howser...

  • Tourist rail excursions took shape in Southern California

    Beginning in the late 1800s, Southern California became a mecca for tourists, and the local railroads created tourist excursions that highlighted the region’s beautiful scenery, delightful new towns and unique local attractions.Many of the routes promoted the expansive orange groves and bustling citrus towns of the Inland Empire as highlights of the excursion.To draw new passengers, the railroads gave their tourist lines alluring names and catchy slogans that were...

  • Holidays

    William Bristol’s April Fool’s Folly

    It’s a little late for an April Fool’s Day article, but I just had to share this great old story about one of the region’s most interesting and eccentric writers, and the fun he often had with his readers on April 1st.In the early 1900s, local journalist and entrepreneur William M. Bristol used his witty and sometimes mischievous writing style to advance the April Fool’s Day tradition by publishing prank newspaper columns on April 1st.Bristol often...

  • News

    The age of endurance

    Long before there were television reality shows, Americans in the 1920s and 1930s were caught up in a bizarre performance fad known as endurance contests.Endurance contests gained major traction in the early 1920s, and they continued throughout the Great Depression as a quirky way of attracting attention. The contests quickly evolved into a seemingly endless variety of solo and group endurance challenges.Almost any activity could be transformed into some type of endurance...

  • Community

    Charles Lindbergh-mania comes to Inland Empire

    When famed aviator Charles A. Lindbergh made his legendary trans-Atlantic solo flight in May 1927, he became an instant, world-renown hero, and virtually every town in the United States joined in celebrating “Lucky Lindy’s” accomplishment.Lindbergh’s national congratulatory tour never quite reached the Inland Empire, but that didn’t stop the local residents from becoming immersed in the “Lindy Mania.”Charles Augustus Lindbergh...

  • Hiking

    Author of book on Pacific Crest Trail to share memories from hike

    Award-winning author and prolific long-distance hiker Barney Scout Mann will in the Inland Empire in January and February, to share his newly released book “The Pacific Crest Trail: Exploring America’s Wilderness Trail.” Mann will present a memorable photo journal of the 2,650-mile wilderness trail and its history, followed by a book signing.There will be two events in the area, sponsored by the Pacific Crest Trail Association, and the book’s publisher,...

  • Historical events

    100 years ago: Epic snow storm turns filmmaker’s fantasy into a frightening reality

    One hundred years ago, the movie-making industry was just putting down roots in Hollywood, and the nearby San Bernardino Mountains became a convenient filming backlot for many of the new studios.Film crews and actors could be found tramping all around the mountains, taking advantage of the pine-covered landscapes and winter scenery. In winter 1915-16, one of these early filmmaking endeavors became a real-life adventure when an epic snowstorm trapped a studio crew and a troupe of...

  • Travel destinations

    How the short-lived Baldy Summit Inn became Southern California’s loftiest resort

    During Southern California’s golden era of tourism in the early 1900s, Mount Baldy became home to one of the most unique resorts in the west. The aptly-named Baldy Summit Inn was perched atop the 10,064 feet summit of Mount Baldy, making it the loftiest resort in the region.The resort’s founder, William B. Dewey was a local pioneer who first climbed Baldy in 1882. Born in Iowa in 1866, Dewey traveled west as a young man, and settled in the Ontario area. He held a...